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Let Computers Do It: Film Set Tragedy Spurs Call to Ban Guns

A large crowd of movie industry workers and New Mexico residents attend a candlelight vigil to honor cinematographer Halyna Hutchins in downtown Albuquerque, N.M. Saturday, Oct. 23, 2021. Hutchins was killed when Alec Baldwin fired a weapon on a film set that a crew member told him was safe. The tragedy has led to calls for fundamental change in Hollywood: the banning of real guns on sets. (AP Photo/Andres Leighton, file)
A large crowd of movie industry workers and New Mexico residents attend a candlelight vigil to honor cinematographer Halyna Hutchins in downtown Albuquerque, N.M. Saturday, Oct. 23, 2021. Hutchins was killed when Alec Baldwin fired a weapon on a film set that a crew member told him was safe. The tragedy has led to calls for fundamental change in Hollywood: the banning of real guns on sets. (AP Photo/Andres Leighton, file)
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New York (AP) -- With computer-generated imagery, it seems the sky’s the limit in the magic Hollywood can produce: elaborate dystopian universes. Trips to outer space, for those neither astronauts nor billionaires. Immersive journeys to the future, or back to bygone eras.

But as a shocked and saddened industry was reminded this week, many productions still use guns — real guns — when filming. And despite rules and regulations, people can get killed, as happened last week when Alec Baldwin fatally shot cinematographer Halyna Hutchins after he was handed a weapon and told it was safe.